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Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Nouriel Roubini on Italian Political Risk

 New York University economics professor Nouriel Roubini comments on the state of the U.S. economy from Cernobbio, Italy.








 Nouriel Roubini is an American professor of Economics at New York University`s Stern School of Business and chairman of RGE Roubini Global Economics

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Fed's Tools to Deal with the Bubbles are not going to work




“driven by zero policy rates in advanced economies,” with QE continuing in the Eurozone and Japan, the authorities were bent on increasing values in homes and stocks, but this can lead to asset bubbles, “and the tools to deal with these bubbles are not going to work.”




Nouriel Roubini is an American professor of Economics at New York University`s Stern School of Business and chairman of RGE Roubini Global Economics

Saturday, May 23, 2015

The Recovery is going to be Subpar



“The recovery is going to be subpar,” “I see a one percent growth in the economy in the next few years. There will also be 11 percent unemployment next year and the recovery is going to be slow. It’s going to feel like a recession even when it ends.” Roubini told CNBC .





 Nouriel Roubini is an American professor of Economics at New York University`s Stern School of Business and chairman of RGE Roubini Global Economics

Friday, May 22, 2015

Long-term Interest Rates are going to go Higher



"It's not going to be a significant surprise. As the economy recovers, as inflation goes higher, gradually long-term interest rates are going to go higher,"





Nouriel Roubini is an American professor of Economics at New York University`s Stern School of Business and chairman of RGE Roubini Global Economics

Thursday, May 21, 2015

The Dollar appreciated much faster than anyone expected


Until recently, U.S. policy makers were not overly concerned about the dollar’s strength, because America’s growth prospects were stronger than in Europe and Japan. Indeed, at the beginning of the year, there was hope that U.S. domestic demand would be strong enough this year to support GDP growth of close to 3%, despite the stronger dollar. Lower oil prices and job creation, it was thought, would boost disposable income and consumption. Capital spending (outside the energy sector) and residential investment would strengthen as growth accelerated.

But things look different today, and U.S. officials’ exchange-rate jitters are becoming increasingly pronounced. The dollar appreciated much faster than anyone expected; and, as data for the first quarter of 2015 suggest, the impact on net exports, inflation, and growth has been larger and more rapid than that implied by policy makers’ statistical models. Moreover, strong domestic demand has failed to materialize; consumption growth was weak in the first quarter, and capital spending and residential investment were even weaker. -- in Project-Syndicate







Nouriel Roubini is an American professor of Economics at New York University`s Stern School of Business and chairman of RGE Roubini Global Economics